Mushroom pierogi

A good dinner-party starter is one that won't have you breaking into a sweat when its time to serve supper. These little dumplings are the Polish equivalent to Italian ravioli. Give yourself some time and a clear workspace (with the radio on) and these pierogi are easy to assemble.

You will need a pastry cutter or a sharp-edge bowl of about 10cm diameter to cut the rolled dough into little rounds. As with most things, practice makes perfect.

Recipe from The Lazy Weekend Cookbook by Matt Williamson (National Trust Books); photography by Jill Speed

Yields1 Serving
 350 g plain (or '00') flour, plus extra for dusting
 1 egg, lightly beaten
 120 ml water
 2 tbsp sour cream, plus extra to serve
For the filling
 1 onion, finely chopped
 3 tbsp butter, plus extra to fry the pierogi (optional)
 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
 250 g mushrooms, finely chopped
 15 g dried mushrooms, rehydrated, drained and finely chopped
 2 tbsp parsley (or dill), finely chopped, plus extra to serve
 3 tbsp fresh breadcrumbs
1

Make the dough by mixing all the ingredients together in a large bowl. Knead for a few minutes until the mixture comes together as a soft smooth dough. Cover in plastic or a clean tea towel and leave to rest at room temperature for at least 20 minutes.

2

To make the filling, fry the onion in the butter over medium heat for 5 minutes or until soft.

3

Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute, then add all the mushrooms. Turn the heat up and cook until the mushrooms give up their water and it has evaporated. Season to taste with salt and pepper and add the herbs and breadcrumbs. Spread on a plate and leave to cool.

4

On a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough to a thickness of about 3mm. Using a pastry cutter, cut out 10cm rounds of dough (you should get about 30 rounds).

5

Hold a round of dough in the palm of your hand. Put a teaspoon of the filling in the centre and fold the dough over the filling. Set the dumpling on your well-floured surface and seal it tight by crimping with the tines of a fork or your fingertips. The pierogi can be frozen at this stage (or keep them in the fridge, but they’re more likely to stick together), or boiled ready to be reheated in butter later. They may stick so keep them apart using greaseproof paper.

6

Boil the pierogi (from frozen is fine) until they float, then continue to boil
for 2 minutes (3 minutes from frozen). Alternatively, you can double-cook them: boil until they float, then fry in lots of butter.

7

Serve with sour cream seasoned with salt and pepper and scatter with chopped herbs.


CategoryCuisine

Ingredients

 350 g plain (or '00') flour, plus extra for dusting
 1 egg, lightly beaten
 120 ml water
 2 tbsp sour cream, plus extra to serve
For the filling
 1 onion, finely chopped
 3 tbsp butter, plus extra to fry the pierogi (optional)
 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
 250 g mushrooms, finely chopped
 15 g dried mushrooms, rehydrated, drained and finely chopped
 2 tbsp parsley (or dill), finely chopped, plus extra to serve
 3 tbsp fresh breadcrumbs

Directions

1

Make the dough by mixing all the ingredients together in a large bowl. Knead for a few minutes until the mixture comes together as a soft smooth dough. Cover in plastic or a clean tea towel and leave to rest at room temperature for at least 20 minutes.

2

To make the filling, fry the onion in the butter over medium heat for 5 minutes or until soft.

3

Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute, then add all the mushrooms. Turn the heat up and cook until the mushrooms give up their water and it has evaporated. Season to taste with salt and pepper and add the herbs and breadcrumbs. Spread on a plate and leave to cool.

4

On a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough to a thickness of about 3mm. Using a pastry cutter, cut out 10cm rounds of dough (you should get about 30 rounds).

5

Hold a round of dough in the palm of your hand. Put a teaspoon of the filling in the centre and fold the dough over the filling. Set the dumpling on your well-floured surface and seal it tight by crimping with the tines of a fork or your fingertips. The pierogi can be frozen at this stage (or keep them in the fridge, but they’re more likely to stick together), or boiled ready to be reheated in butter later. They may stick so keep them apart using greaseproof paper.

6

Boil the pierogi (from frozen is fine) until they float, then continue to boil
for 2 minutes (3 minutes from frozen). Alternatively, you can double-cook them: boil until they float, then fry in lots of butter.

7

Serve with sour cream seasoned with salt and pepper and scatter with chopped herbs.

Mushroom pierogi