Sunday roast ‘in the hole’

MasterChef finalist and Cotswold chef Andrew Kojima mashes up the traditional Sunday lunch with toad in the hole. Photo by Kirstie Young.

Yields4 Servings
 2 eggs 125g plain flour 200g milk 1 (1-1.5kg) medium chicken vegetable oil 2-3 pinches of dried thyme (or mixed herbs) 6 medium potatoes 3 large carrots 200ml water 1 large leek 1 small head of broccoli 1 cubed chicken stock 300ml boiling water 1 tbsp gravy powder 1 tbsp redcurrant jelly
1

Start by making the ‘hole’. Mix the eggs and flour together, along with a pinch of salt and freshly cracked black pepper, in a large mixing bowl with a whisk. It should be the consistency of single cream. Set aside for later. 

2

Preheat the oven to 170C/325F/gas mark 3. Place the chicken in the centre of a large baking tray. Coat the skin with vegetable oil, then sprinkle over salt and dried herbs.

 
3

Scrub the potatoes, but leave the skin on, then cut slices into each 1-2mm apart, but only cut half way through the potato. Coat the potato skin in a little more oil and sprinkle with salt. Place the potatoes around the chicken.

4

Cut the carrots into large pieces and place them standing up in the baking tray. Add the water and roast in the oven for 40 minutes, whereupon the water should have evaporated.

5

Add another 2-3 tbsp of vegetable oil into the baking tray, then put back in the oven and turn it up to 190C/375F/gas mark 5.

6

Cut the leek into 2.5cm lengths and prepare the broccoli into 6-7 medium sized florets.

7

After about 5 minutes, the oil should be hot enough. Pour the Yorkshire pudding mix into the baking tray and add the leeks and broccoli wherever they will fit. Place the baking tray back in the oven and roast for a further 25-30 minutes. The batter should rise and be crispy around the edges, but soft in the middle (something for everyone – unless everyone likes the crispy bits!).

8

Meanwhile, make the gravy. Dissolve the stock cube into the water then add the gravy powder. Once it is all dissolved, add in the redcurrant jelly and stir until dissolved. Serve family style, straight from the baking dish.

CategoryCuisine

Ingredients

 2 eggs 125g plain flour 200g milk 1 (1-1.5kg) medium chicken vegetable oil 2-3 pinches of dried thyme (or mixed herbs) 6 medium potatoes 3 large carrots 200ml water 1 large leek 1 small head of broccoli 1 cubed chicken stock 300ml boiling water 1 tbsp gravy powder 1 tbsp redcurrant jelly

Directions

1

Start by making the ‘hole’. Mix the eggs and flour together, along with a pinch of salt and freshly cracked black pepper, in a large mixing bowl with a whisk. It should be the consistency of single cream. Set aside for later. 

2

Preheat the oven to 170C/325F/gas mark 3. Place the chicken in the centre of a large baking tray. Coat the skin with vegetable oil, then sprinkle over salt and dried herbs.

 
3

Scrub the potatoes, but leave the skin on, then cut slices into each 1-2mm apart, but only cut half way through the potato. Coat the potato skin in a little more oil and sprinkle with salt. Place the potatoes around the chicken.

4

Cut the carrots into large pieces and place them standing up in the baking tray. Add the water and roast in the oven for 40 minutes, whereupon the water should have evaporated.

5

Add another 2-3 tbsp of vegetable oil into the baking tray, then put back in the oven and turn it up to 190C/375F/gas mark 5.

6

Cut the leek into 2.5cm lengths and prepare the broccoli into 6-7 medium sized florets.

7

After about 5 minutes, the oil should be hot enough. Pour the Yorkshire pudding mix into the baking tray and add the leeks and broccoli wherever they will fit. Place the baking tray back in the oven and roast for a further 25-30 minutes. The batter should rise and be crispy around the edges, but soft in the middle (something for everyone – unless everyone likes the crispy bits!).

8

Meanwhile, make the gravy. Dissolve the stock cube into the water then add the gravy powder. Once it is all dissolved, add in the redcurrant jelly and stir until dissolved. Serve family style, straight from the baking dish.

Sunday roast ‘in the hole’